I’ve always considered this blog a safe place to share even the most embarrassing stories/insights/confessions, and today I’d like to share a noteworthy and useful discovery that is shrouded in a fairly thick layer of moral ambiguity. [takes deep breath] OK, here goes… SO I WAS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS YESTERDAY (Am I yelling? Sometimes I speak loudly when I’m uncomfortable…), where Mrs. You Hear That and I were killing exactly 10 minutes before heading to an appointment at another establishment in the same mall. This was my first trip to Urban Outfitters. I found that Urban Outfitters makes me uneasy in the same way that places like Hot Topic do/did, in that there’s something a little suspect about a national chain providing all the tools necessary to adopt a specific identity that’s constantly on the downswing of the hipness curve. I’m sure this happens in other circumstances, and I’m sure plenty of good people (many of whom are about a decade younger than I am) buy things at UO. Nonetheless, an irksome feeling persisted throughout those 10 minutes, even as I flipped through their smallish collection of new vinyl, which contained several volumes I either own or want. Though I typically lose control of any shred of frugality around records, I knew these were off limits for three main reasons. 1. The size of the selection leads me to believe that each item was chosen in a very specific and very creepy way; 2. Supporting local record stores is tremendously important to me; and 3. They were overpriced. After leaving the vinyl section empty-handed, I found myself at a sale rack that contained a neat coffee table book about rock stars and their instruments (Jeff Tweedy’s contribution was so terse and disinterested that I couldn’t help but chuckle. Don’t ever change, Jeff.), upon which a dozen or so records were leaning. What do we have here? New vinyl for… $9.99 A POP?!? Including EMA’s Past Life Martyred Saints? WTF?!?Past Life Martyred Saints is an incredibly interesting and rewarding album (I have Pitchfork Editor-in-Chief Mark Richardson’s enthusiasm to thank for my first listening to it) and $10 bucks is a ridiculous price for a new copy on vinyl. If you collect vinyl and live near an Urban Outfitters, do yourself a favor and stop by the sale rack. Don’t think of it as patronizing a national chain, think of it as exploiting a loophole in the algorithm a national chain uses to profit off young people’s desire to be cool. Whether you’re a vinyl person or not, I invite you to preview “California” from Past Life Martyred Saints here and click here to buy the albumelectronically from the current market leader in moral ambiguity. 

I’ve always considered this blog a safe place to share even the most embarrassing stories/insights/confessions, and today I’d like to share a noteworthy and useful discovery that is shrouded in a fairly thick layer of moral ambiguity. [takes deep breath] OK, here goes… SO I WAS AT URBAN OUTFITTERS YESTERDAY (Am I yelling? Sometimes I speak loudly when I’m uncomfortable…), where Mrs. You Hear That and I were killing exactly 10 minutes before heading to an appointment at another establishment in the same mall. This was my first trip to Urban Outfitters. I found that Urban Outfitters makes me uneasy in the same way that places like Hot Topic do/did, in that there’s something a little suspect about a national chain providing all the tools necessary to adopt a specific identity that’s constantly on the downswing of the hipness curve. I’m sure this happens in other circumstances, and I’m sure plenty of good people (many of whom are about a decade younger than I am) buy things at UO. Nonetheless, an irksome feeling persisted throughout those 10 minutes, even as I flipped through their smallish collection of new vinyl, which contained several volumes I either own or want. Though I typically lose control of any shred of frugality around records, I knew these were off limits for three main reasons. 1. The size of the selection leads me to believe that each item was chosen in a very specific and very creepy way; 2. Supporting local record stores is tremendously important to me; and 3. They were overpriced. After leaving the vinyl section empty-handed, I found myself at a sale rack that contained a neat coffee table book about rock stars and their instruments (Jeff Tweedy’s contribution was so terse and disinterested that I couldn’t help but chuckle. Don’t ever change, Jeff.), upon which a dozen or so records were leaning. What do we have here? New vinyl for… $9.99 A POP?!? Including EMA’s Past Life Martyred SaintsWTF?!?Past Life Martyred Saints is an incredibly interesting and rewarding album (I have Pitchfork Editor-in-Chief Mark Richardson’s enthusiasm to thank for my first listening to it) and $10 bucks is a ridiculous price for a new copy on vinyl. If you collect vinyl and live near an Urban Outfitters, do yourself a favor and stop by the sale rack. Don’t think of it as patronizing a national chain, think of it as exploiting a loophole in the algorithm a national chain uses to profit off young people’s desire to be cool. Whether you’re a vinyl person or not, I invite you to preview “California” from Past Life Martyred Saints here and click here to buy the albumelectronically from the current market leader in moral ambiguity

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  1. youhearthat posted this